Forest Watch Campaign

Posted by Andrea West - July 21, 2011 - Wild Lands and Water - No Comments
Rocky Mountain Wild’s Forest Watch Campaign examines forestry practices and forest management across Colorado, mainly on national forest lands, which cover about 14 million acres, or 23 percent of Colorado. We monitor and educate the public about proposed projects on all seven of our State’s national forests, and work to modify the ones that could degrade or destroy ecological values. This includes “forest health” projects, which are often thinly disguised commercial logging projects that propose to cut more than is needed to protect homes and other infrastructure. [Read more - link]
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We encourage agencies to restore and maintain natural ecosystems, including the use of prescribed (controlled) burns and mechanical fuel reduction to manage vegetation. We focus on protecting:  rare wildlife species such as lynx, roadless areas, old growth forests, rare plants, riparian areas, intact watersheds, and other special places.
We take the lead in Colorado on responding to major proposed Federal regulations and policy changes that could effect protection of important resources. See our comments on the [Forest Service’s planning rule - link] and the latest version of the [proposed Colorado Roadless Rule - link]
We monitor implementation of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program, under which the Forest Service has let contracts for logging large areas of unnaturally dense, fire-prone stands along Colorado’s Front Range and the Uncompahgre Plateau on the west slope. Unfortunately, the program got off to a very bad start in late 2010 when the Forest Service approved cutting of one of the few remaining old growth ponderosa pine stands on the Front Range, even though the agency had told the public that mainly small diameter trees would be cut. [Read more here -link]
(To be added when appropriate):
The xyz project, in the abc roadless area, proposes to cut much more area than is needed to protect an adjacent subdivision. [Read more here.]
Your comments are needed by (date) to reduce huge propose logging on the Rio Grande National Forest [Read more here.]

We ensure that Colorado's forests are managed to protect wildlife habitat, clean air and water, and the enjoyment of future generations.

We ensure that Colorado's forests are managed to protect wildlife habitat, clean air and water, and the enjoyment of future generations.

Our Forest Watch Campaign monitors forestry practices and forest management across Colorado. We keep a close watch on National Forest lands, which cover about 14 million acres in Colorado, nearly a quarter of the state. We focus on maintaining resilient forests and  protecting rare wildlife species such as lynx, roadless areas, old growth forests, rare plants, riparian areas, and intact watersheds.

We monitor and educate the public about proposed projects on all seven of our state’s National Forests, and work to modify the ones that could degrade ecological values. This includes so-called “forest health” projects, which are often thinly disguised commercial logging projects that propose to cut more than is needed to protect  homes and infrastructure.  Rocky Mountain Wild continues a multi-year effort to steer Forest Service projects towards targeted, science-based actions that will help protect communities and forests without sacrificing water quality and wildlife. By building relationships with diverse stakeholders, bringing ecological science into the dialogue, and capitalizing on the situation posed by dwindling federal budgets, we have made substantial progress in the last year.

We take the lead in Colorado on responding to major proposed Federal regulations and policy changes that could effect protection of important resources. See our comments on the Forest Service’s planning rule and the latest version of the proposed Colorado Roadless Rule.

We monitor implementation of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program, under which the Forest Service has let contracts for logging large areas of unnaturally dense, fire-prone stands along Colorado’s Front Range and the Uncompahgre Plateau on the West Slope. Unfortunately, the program got off to a bad start in late 2010 when the Forest Service approved cutting of one of the few remaining old growth ponderosa pine stands on the Front Range, even though the agency had told the public that mainly small diameter trees would be cut.